10 Types of Coffee in Vietnam You Must Try

This is a list of the most well-known coffee types that are common in Vietnam. Of course, there are many varieties and many coffee shops will possess their own signature coffee drinks, but these are some usual styles that I’ve observed consistently throughout Vietnam. After encountering coffee in Vietnam, you’ll see it difficult to go back to your “French Vanilla K-Cups.”

Caphe Sua – Vietnamese milk coffee

Caphe Sua

Not only authentic it is, but also favorite coffee types of the locals in Vietnam. Because most parts of Vietnam are hot and humid most of the year, the most common method for drinking this coffee is Iced. If you order coffee with milk in Vietnam, you won’t be getting what you assume. At this point, “milk” means “sweetened condensed milk.” You won’t assume how fabulous it is in Vietnamese coffee. They add a healthy amount of Condensed milk into the bottom of the glass, overflow it with ice, then pour in plenty of extremely strong concentrated fresh Vietnamese black coffee. They serve it with a spoon. Mix it up and sip it gradually savoring the taste. Depending on who makes your coffee, it’s normally the perfect amount of sweet. You get that intense dark and nutty coffee taste, but the condensed milk cutesy the bitterness and lightly sweetens the coffee giving it a more complex and full-bodied taste. It’s incredible. And believe me—you black coffee zealots haven’t ever had extremely strong coffee until you’ve tried it Vietnamese style. You’ll be waiting for the condensed milk before long.

Craft Coffee

Craft Coffee

Similar to other places in the world, Vietnam has a craft coffee commotion. If you’re craving for something a little more high-brow and if you’re attempting more than just a caffeine fix, you will have your pick of the many craft coffee shops and roasters that can be seen all over Vietnam. If you like your coffee as much as I do, you’ll use the bean to cup experience. You can see how the café changes the raw beans into the seductive silky espresso you are drinking. For something light— test the Aeropress. For something medium bodied, try the Syphon, for the richest most robust choice, go with the French press. One of my favorite spots in DaLat is Viet Café. When I visited and was scanning the menu, I started on an internal struggle—I was really craving a feature latte, but I really wanted to encounter the flavor of their house-roasted beans so I was thinking trying one of their craft options. While I was making up my mind, one of the staff caused me a beautifully decorated latte and set it in front of me with a smile. It was my happy day. They were having a latte art contest and so I got to drink their art plan on the house. Of course, then, I immediately ordered my Aeropress, so in the end, I got it all for the value of one. Dreams actually do come true. And of course, you can get amazingly good Espresso Based coffees everywhere.

Yogurt Coffee

Yogurt Coffee

It’s very different and absolutely good, but this one isn’t as common as Caphe Sua. The bottom of the glass is loaded with crushed ice, then a large dollop of creamy freshly-made yogurt that is just gently sweetened. Then they pour the very heavy concentrated Vietnamese coffee on top. Stir it all together, and it’s almost a coffee smoothie. You get tanginess from the yogurt and the richness from the coffee but the creaminess from the yogurt skips the bitterness. It’s charming.

Weasel Coffee

Weasel Coffee

I don’t acknowledge who determined that the poop of certain animals makes coffee more flavorful, but it can now be observed in many coffee cores around the world and people willingly slurp it down. Of course, I tried the Civet coffee in Laos, but in Vietnam, Weasels seem to be their animal of selection. They feed the weasel the coffee beans. Then weasels eat and digest the beans, but move the beans in their stool which is then harvested, ripened, and roasted and ground up and offered for you in a steaming mug. Are you confident enough to try it?

Coconut Coffee

Coconut Coffee

Coffee and coconut, Coconut Coffee, is one of all time favorite combinations of Vietnamese. You are in the tropical country of Vietnam where coconuts seem to be stretching from every tree—why not add it in your coffee? My favorite kind of coconut coffee is the coconut latte where they add fresh coconut milk instead of milk to make the latte. The result—all the richness and creaminess of the latte with the nutty dark flavor of the espresso, but the coconut supplements that tropical buttery and sweet richness that just promotes the coffee to the next level. Of course, you can make it sweetened, but my favorite is just a raw coconut latte with no sugar. You can drink this coffee anywhere–all over Vietnam.

Banana Coffee

Banana Coffee

It’s bananas, another popular fruit in Southeast Asia. I’ve only tried the banana iced coffee. It’s primarily just iced coffee with banana. If you love bananas and you love coffee, then you’ll love this tropical creation.

Frappe

Frappe

As you order food or drink, it’s constantly an experience seeing how they will understand your order. You really never guess what you’re going to get. You’ll order something and something completely different or surprising might come out of the kitchen. Sometimes this can be disgusting, but usually, it all works out. When I ordered an Iced Coconut Latte at a café in Hanoi, I was assuming a coconut latte spilled over ice. Instead what I got was more alike to a bowl of ice cream. Sure there was coconut, and coffee, but also a lot of ice and other ingredients all mixed together and it was given to me in a bowl with a spoon. However, it is extremely delicious!

Filter Coffee

Filter Coffee

This is a very popular way of drinking coffee in Vietnam and this is nearly like a small combo between drip coffee and French press. You get a glass with some condensed milk in the bottom, then they bump this little silver filter on the cover. It’s loaded with fresh ground coffee and boiling water. Don’t order this one in a hurry because it will ever so slowly drop through the filter into your glass. Remarkably tasty, strong coffee – that’s all you get.

 Cinnamon Coffee  

Cinnamon Coffee 

It is gaining in fame, while this one may not be quickly achievable throughout Vietnam. As if Cà Phê Sữa đá (Vietnamese Iced Milk Coffee) was not already astonishing enough, when you combine the cinnamon, you won’t guess the flavor. It’s like the drink version of a cinnamon roll. You still see the nutty bitterness of the coffee, with the rich sweetness of the Sweetened Condensed Milk, and later the cinnamon just knocks it out of the park. The greatest place to get this marvelous work is the cafe: Loading T in Hanoi. The owner roasts his own beans with the cinnamon and grinds a distinct cinnamon coffee blend.

Egg Coffee

Egg Coffee

It’s on each tourist’s ultimate list when they arrive at Hanoi, egg coffee is one of Hanoi’s most symbol drinks. Of course, the reputation of this drink means that it’s now available throughout the country, but believe me, you must try it in Hanoi. It’s just not similar to other places. Primarily what you get is a little amount of extremely hard black Vietnamese coffee at the bottom of your mug containing about 1/4th of the drink. The rest of the mug is loaded with this sweet egg concoction which is made from densely whipped raw eggs and sugar. It’s about like a mixture between a meringue and a custard. While you sip, the bitter coffee distinguishes perfectly with the sweet egg foam. You can’t leave Vietnam without trying it once at least, it truly is not just dessert drink so that it will not be substituting your morning cup of coffee.

Source: Modoho.com.vn

Filed Under: FoodRestaurant

Tagged With: Japanese restaurants in Ho Chi Minh City

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